ETHNOGRAPHY OF THE TERRITORY EAST OF THE CURZON LINE
The disputed territory which extended from the Curzon Line to Russia's western border (1921)
had approximately 13,000,000 inhabitants over an area covering 188,000 kilometres.
The following statistics were gathered from a 1931 Polish census of the area.
Poles
4,794,000
39.0 %
Ukrainians & Rusyns
4,139,000
34.4 %
Jews
1,045,000
8.4 %
Belarussians
993,000
8.5 %
Lithuanians
76,000
0.6 %
Others (Poleszuks)
845,000
6.4 %
They were also classified into religious groups:
Roman Catholics
4,016,000
33.4 %
Greek Catholics (or Uniates)
3,050,000
25.4 %
Orthodox
3,529,000
29.3 %
Jewish
1,222,000
10.2 %
Other Christians denominations
180,000
1.5 %
The cities and towns west of the Curzon Line were predominantly Polish.  The rural population represented
various ethnic groups in numbers far greater than found in urban cities.  Southern Poland had a large
Ukrainian population, but of Galician descent.

After World War II, Poland acquired new territory to the west, which included Silesia, Pomerania, Lubus Land,
Warmia, and Masuria.  These were the provinces originally part of eastern Germany and from which German
inhabitants were expelled after the war.